Tag Archives: Real Estate

Express Yourself: Choosing Paint Colors You’ll Love Living With

The ABCs of Interior Paint Colors

There’s a lot riding on your paint choices, for today and for tomorrow. You don’t want to be that seller who wonders why their bronze-colored sponge-painted living room isn’t attracting more buyers. Turn off HGTV and focus. Trendy painting techniques can be fun, but they also create a lot of work for you if you decide to repaint. That doesn’t mean there’s no room for them, just use them sparingly.

Instead, we’re going to focus on creating a timeless palette that not only makes sense in your space, but that will eventually make potential buyers walk in the door and say, “Wow.” Color conveys a deep stream of meaning, it can influence such varying perceptions as:

Scale of the room. In general, dark colors tend to shrink spaces, where light colors open them up. The more light you can get into your house, the better for your mental health and the more positively people will see the room.

Emotions associated with your home. Believe it or not, there is something to that whole “colors affect emotions” thing. In fact, they can even influence your behavior, something marketers have known for a while. If you want people to linger, you have to choose colors that won’t make them anxious or claustrophobic.

How the room is to be used. Again, if you can influence emotion with color, you can also sort of non-verbally indicate the room’s role in the home. Want to turn a nondescript dining room into a formal dining room with minimal effort? Deep, rich colors for the win.

The colors you choose to use inside your home say a lot about your space, how you think you’re going to use it and, frankly, tell a bit of a story about you or your family unit. This is probably why people who move from apartments into their first homes are often so eager to jump right into a painting frenzy.

Choosing Paint Colors You Won’t Regret

With your fancy new color wheel in hand, you can pick color schemes that are:

Monochromatic. These are the easiest of all. Start with a single color, say, blue, then just follow the color wheel to the center and choose various saturations of the same color to make your palette. Typically, a middling hue is used for the wall color, a darker color as accent and a lighter color (or just white) as trim paint. It’s a classic look for any color on the wheel.

Complementary. Choose a color you like, then zip directly across the wheel to find its complement. Some of these work better than others. For example, red and green are great for the holiday season, but might be a bit much indoors. Now, if you’re painting the outside of your WWI-era cottage, that’s a whole different bag of pigment.

Analogous. One of the most subtle, but elegant configurations, analogous colors are colors that are literally right next to one another on the color wheel. These colors are similar, but different enough that it’s obvious. Blue, blue-green and green make a great combo for a relaxing spa-style bathroom, but I’ve even seen some wild stuff done with analogous shades of purple that really kind of took my breath away. Choose one as your primary and use the other two to support it.

Triadic. For the bold and adventurous, triadic color schemes can create very personal spaces. Although these colors harmonize, in theory, they can be potential sales killers later, so if you go with a triadic color-scheme, don’t be offended if your future Realtor suggests a paint job. Start at the main color you want in the space, then choose the two colors that are equal distance away from it. For example, a triadic purple color scheme would include green and orange. Again, one color should dominate and the others support.

Tetradic. Much like the triadic color scheme, tetradic color schemes can be really loud if done incorrectly, so do so with caution. Instead of there being three colors spaced equally around the color wheel, this scheme uses four. So, if your main color was blue, you’d also use yellow-green, orange, and red-violet. Definitely not for every home or for the faint of heart.

To be honest, most people choose one color and then a different color (often white, black or deep brown) as a trim color. And this works, too. It does. As long as you know what that color is going to look like when it’s dry. This is an important caution, because what the paint looks like at the store, what it looks like when you pour it in the tray, even what it looks like when you paint it on the wall — that’s not what it’ll look like dry.

Try Your Paint Before You Buy

Oh, my, but there is a way to try the paint on before you buy it. It’s not a secret, it’s not easy, there’s no refund if you don’t like it, but you’ll have saved yourself a lot of effort and sadness if you use this one simple trick.

When you’re at the paint counter with your paint chip, and you’re really excited about your paint color, ask the person behind the counter to mix up two samples. One of the color you want from the chip, and another of the color that’s just below it. That second color is a slightly less saturated version of the one you chose, so it’s very similar, but you’ll notice a difference in any well-lit room.

If you’re looking at ultra light colors, do the opposite. Choose the color that’s slightly more saturated. Those ghostly paints have a bad habit of all looking white at the end of the process, instead of having a hint of pink or blue or whatever, unless they’re placed in just the right color scheme.

Over the weekend, paint a fairly large area of the room you want to do with both paints. A two-foot-by-two-foot space is good, a four-foot-by-four-foot space is even better. This gives you a really good feel for what that paint is going to look like in your space with your lighting. The lighting in the paint or home improvement store is never a great one to pick paint by.

Harmony Throughout the Home

One last very important point to note that might have been better mentioned sooner is how your color choices should also harmonize with existing materials that are expensive or difficult to remove, like carpets, tile, countertops, tubs and the like.

Let’s say you bought a super cool, mostly restored ranch style house from the 1950s. There’s a lot going on there, but it’s mostly pastel. You’ve got one bathroom that’s pastel green, another that’s pastel blue. This is not the place to break out the burgundies. One of two things will have to happen, either you have to find a way to bridge from pastels to the richer color families, or you need to pick a different color.

Bridging these color gaps usually requires making small steps in the right direction until you’re at your destination, so you’re going to be putting in a lot of effort to make those two choices work. But gutting both bathrooms isn’t really an option, either. So, choose a color that makes sense for the room. A cool gray is often a great companion to these colors, depending on the countertops.

But you don’t just want to think of harmony in terms of one room, you want to sort of make the whole house feel like it was painted with intention and a plan, so that as you move between spaces, some elements from one room travel with you to the next. There needs to be some kind of continuity, be it color, tone, design elements or a mix of these to pull the whole house together.

If your house opens into a back garden or outdoor kitchen, moving those elements outside or the outside elements in also makes a lot of sense. The main point: avoid jarring changes between rooms because it is jarring — to you, your family members, your visitors and one of these days, a potential buyer.

You Don’t Have to Go It Alone

I know, you opened this article hoping for some quick and dirty paint advice that ended with you choosing Seafoam Green because it’s soothing to puppies and instead ended up with a mini education in interior design. Even though there’s a lot of info here, it’s really not as complicated as it sounds. But if the thought of designing a plan for your whole home at once is too overwhelming, help is just around the corner.

Call Regina Singh for more info.

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5 Reasons It’ll Pay to Sell Your Home Early in 2018

By Holly Amaya | Jan 10, 2018

It’s been nearly a decade since the Great Recession delivered the worst housing crash in modern memory. But these days, the fallout feels squarely in the rearview mirror. Markets have bounced back with fervor, and confidence is skyrocketing: From Charlotte, NC, to Stockton, CA—and everywhere in between—homes are flying off the market at record prices, and buyers are still clamoring to get in the game.

One thing is clear: It’s a great time to be a seller.

“We’ve seen two or three years of what could be considered unsustainable levels of price appreciation, as well as an inventory shortage that resulted in a record low number of homes for sale across the country,” says Javier Vivas, director of economic research for realtor.com®.

Sounds like the stuff of seller’s dreams, right? But know this: If you plan to sell in 2018—and you want to unload your home quickly and for maximum money—your window of opportunity may be rapidly narrowing. Here’s why you should get moving ASAP.

1. Rates are still historically low, drawing buyers into the market

2. Inventory remains tight—and demand high

3. Home prices are still increasing

4. People have more money in their pocket

5. Millennials are ready to commit

Read more.

#MicroHouse #Tinyhomes #Trends #Minimalist #Millenials #ReginaSingh

tinyhome

From the architect. The Micro-house is based on the minimum space people need for basic indoor movement, such as sitting, laying and standing. The form of the Micro-house is designed to act as a combination of furniture and architecture elements. When being rotated, the unit of the Micro house will shift its space which contains all kinds of housing activities, such as resting, working, washing and cooking, etc. The Micro house unit can not only be used as single- functional room, but also can be grouped together as a housing suite, or even residential cluster.

#TinyHouses #MicroHousing #Architecture #Minimalist #Millenials #ReginaSingh

tinyhome

Following a successful pilot launch in Boston and $1 million in venture backing, a startup company called Getaway has recently launched their service to New Yorkers. The company allows customers to rent out a collection of designer “tiny houses” placed in secluded rural settings north of the city; beginning at $99 per night, the service is hoping to offer respite for overstimulated city folk seeking to unplug and “find themselves.” The company was founded by business student Jon Staff and law student Pete Davis, both from Harvard University, out of discussions with other students about the issues with housing and the need for new ideas to house a new generation. From that came the idea of introducing the experience of Tiny House living to urbanites through weekend rentals. More info.

Don’t Let a Renovation Ruin a Marriage

One of the reasons we’re all so into real estate reality TV is that it really brings the drama. Who among us hasn’t wanted to (temporarily) kill their spouse when remodeling their home? What parents haven’t had their entire house overtaken by toys? If these conundrums sound uncomfortably familiar—and you want some advice on how to survive—check out this week’s worth of real estate reality TV and the hard-won lessons within.

‘House Hunters Renovation’

This “House Hunters” spinoff differs from the original in that each episode runs a full hour, and buyers not only look at three houses and then pick one, they renovate it as well. In the first episode of the new season, an Austin couple who have been married only four days decide to remodel a small condo, but disagreements abound. Diana wants to stick to the budget, and Sean wants to splurge on all the bells and whistles. Their tastes and priorities are so astronomically different, you wonder how they ever decided to get married at all.

Lesson learned: Remodeling can severely stress a marriage, but calling in a third party can help. The couple brought in designer Courtney Blanton of Courtney Blanton Interiors to mediate. She presented them with beautiful options they never would have come up with on their own. The end result is stunning, and their marriage survived.

Read more.

 

Did you know 6 features that define a bedroom – #ReginaSingh

There are, in fact, a number of details that make a room a “bedroom”—and both home buyers and sellers had best know them to avoid misunderstandings.

Six features that define a bedroom

The laws vary by state, but here are six ways you can tell if your room is a bedroom rather than just a “room”:

  1. Minimum square footage:Although this can vary from state to state, 70 to 80 square feet is generally the acceptable minimum.
  2. Minimum horizontal footage: A bedroom must also measure at least 7 feet in any horizontal direction.
  3. Two means of egress: There have to be two ways out of a bedroom. Traditionally, these would be a door and a window.
  4. Minimum ceiling height: At least half of the bedroom ceiling has to be at least 7 feet tall.
  5. Minimum window size: The window opening must be a minimum size, usually 5.7 square feet.
  6. A heating and cooling element: We’re talking a heater (a space heater won’t qualify) as well as a way to cool it down, whether that’s by opening a window or good old AC.

Thinking of Selling? Don’t Overlook an Outdated Kitchen. #ReginaSingh

If you are planning on listing your home for sale, make sure that you don’t overlook the condition of your kitchen. A recent article on realtor.com listed “7 Signs Your Kitchen Is Way Overdue for a Renovation,” in which they warned:

“Dated kitchens–just like bathrooms–are a major barrier for resale. Buyers want modern amenities and styling, and most aren’t interested in renovating post-purchase.”

Kitchen remodels can be pricey, with many complete remodels costing $20,000 or more. But not every kitchen needs a full remodel. There are many smaller projects that will help buyers see themselves trying their favorite Pinterest recipe in your home! Here are a couple of project ideas that, if you’re handy or know someone who is, could end up boosting your home’s value without breaking the bank:

  • Are the cabinets in good shape but need an update? A new coat of paint and some updated hardware will instantly freshen up the space and drastically change the feel of the room all for under $300.
  • A new backsplash to match the freshly painted cabinets updates the space and adds some style while staying under $200, depending on the size of the room.
  • If the kitchen seems dark, consider adding LED under cabinet lighting for around $40.
  • If replacing the countertops in the kitchen isn’t within your budget, consider using a top coat to cover the current countertops.

If you decide to complete a full remodel of your outdated kitchen, you can expect a 67% return on a $30,000 upgrade (the national median cost). The benefits of a kitchen remodel aren’t purely financial, according to Houselogic:

“Eighty-two percent of homeowners said their updated kitchen gave them a greater desire to be at home, and 95% were happy or satisfied with the result.”

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